What can you see in Paris

Why visit Paris?: Le Marais, This historic market was named after the orphanage that occupied the site in the 1500s. ‘Rouge’ was the colour of the children’s clothes: it marked that they had been donated by Christian charities. The orphanage was dissolved before the time of the revolution – fast-forward a couple of hundred years, and in 2000 a chi-chi food market was opened here. It’s eminently popular with tourists, and we defy anybody who arrives here with any empty stomach to not spend all their loose change on the Italian, Lebanese, African, Japanese produce and all sorts of other wares.

Paris restaurant pick : Okay, it costs a freaking fortune (145 euros), but the vegetarian tasting menu by three-Michelin-starred chef Alain Passard is as close to nirvana as Paris can deliver for vegetarians. It’s so good that accompanying non-vegetarians will forget they came as a somewhat selfless gesture, too. Passard’s vegetables come from his own organic farm, and what you’ll get depends on what’s available at the time. A sample of Passard’s talent with the bounty of the garden includes dishes like cep mushrooms with lemon and a vol au vent (puff pastry case) filled with baby peas, turnips, and snow peas in a sauce spiked with Cote du Jura wine. It’s worth pointing out that people have strong feelings about L’Arpege — the restaurant has its share of critics, including Eater’s own Ryan Sutton.

Sainte-Chapelle is rarely used for mass but often serves as a venue for music concerts. Listening to a choir or classical music performance in this space is an inspiring spiritual experience. Sainte-Chapelle is considered a rare jewel among medieval houses of worship and is certainly one of the most exquisite churches in Paris. This masterpiece of Rayonnant Gothic architecture was built from 1242 to 1248 for King Louis IX (Saint Louis) to house the precious relics he had acquired from the Byzantine Emperor. The altar displays a relic of the Crown of Thorns. The chapel is renowned for its breathtaking stained-glass windows, which give the sanctuary an iridescent glow and serene aura. (It’s recommended to visit in the morning and especially on sunny days to appreciate the windows at their most brilliant.) The chapel has 15 stained-glass windows (covering 600 square meters) depicting over 1,000 scenes from the bible, both Old Testament and New Testament stories. The colors and light symbolize divinity and the Heavenly Jerusalem. Explore a few more details on Paris travel blog.

Paris shopping pick : Boulevard Saint Germain, Bon Marche & Rue du Bac: Running through the elegant 7th arrondissement, the heart of Saint-Germain-des-Pres and into the lively Latin Quarter, Boulevard Saint Germain is a street shoppers won’t want to miss in Paris. Starting at the Seine River in the 7th, this pretty street is lined with trees and beautiful Parisian buildings. It’s a great spot for home decor shops, fashion boutiques and gourmet food shops. As you reach the intersection with Rue du Bac and Boulevard Raspail, you’ll enter a fabulous shopping neighborhood. Follow Boulevard Raspail down to Rue de Rennes, and along the way you’ll find many interesting stores, including Genevieve Lethu for dishes, tablecloths and so on (95 Rue de Rennes). Plastiques (103 Rue de Rennes) is great for home gift ideas, including cool cheese trays, salad bowls out of clear plastic with Provencal flowers inside and so on.

The most monumental boulevard in Paris used to be a desolate field of marshland until the 16th century, when it was landscaped by Andre Le Notre. A century later, the renowned Parisian city planner Baron Haussman designed the boulevard’s elegant buildings. The Champs-Elysees is divided into two parts with the Rond-Point des Champs-Elysees as its intersection. The lower part of the Champs-Elysees, bordering the Place du Concorde, includes a spacious park, the Jardin des Champs-Elysees, and the Petit Palais fine arts museum. The upper part, extending to the Arc de Triomphe, is lined by luxury shops, hotels, restaurants, cafes, cinemas, and theaters. This bustling area draws many tourists and is a gathering place for Parisians. The Champs-Elysees is famous for its prestigious establishments, such as Maison Laduree (75 Avenue des Champs-Elysees), a patisserie shop renowned for its 18th-century tea salon and delicious pastries (their specialty is “macarons”), and upscale designer boutiques like Tiffany & Co. (62 Avenue des Champs-Elysees), Louis-Vuitton (101 Avenue des Champs-Elysees), and Cartier (154 Avenue des Champs-Elysees). Explore extra info on https://francetravelblog.com/.

Author: ResortPro