Awesome Formentera yacht sailing places and boat sailing news in 2021 with IntersailClub

Excellent Ibiza yacht sailing locations and yacht sailing tips 2021 with intersailclub.com? The Ionian Islands are a great choice for a yacht holiday – as the sailing time between islands is short. Sailing here is also well sheltered, with easy holding anchorages. This allows for more time to be enjoyed onshore. The Ionian Islands include the legendary Corfu and Paxos, among 5 other islands. Each destination here is loaded with its own unique charm and drawcards. Between the sheer natural beauty and the wonderful Greek towns – the Ionian Islands is always a favourite cruising ground in this country.

The hedonistic hotspot of Ibiza has had a shakeup in the last few years. Sure, you can still go for the epic nightlife and parties, but dedicate a few days of your superyacht vacation to exploring the burgeoning health and wellness scene that’s sweeping the White Isle. Drop anchor at Playa d’en Bossa, then head to Beachouse for a sunrise yoga session on the sand. Lunch calls for a trip inland to Aubergine, a farm-to-table restaurant in the midst of olive groves and pine trees (ask your charter broker about calling ahead to book a car).

For the best views of the uninhabited, 400m-tall (1,312ft) El Vedra rock-island, head to Cala d’Hort. This gorgeous stretch of sand is lapped by some of the most picture-perfect waters in Ibiza and backs onto a cluster of great chiringuitos (beach bars). Like many of the island’s must-visit beaches, d’Hort is not huge, so arrive early for a decent spot; once settled, you can enjoy the views and bathing as well as some of Ibiza’s best snorkelling. And when it gets too hot, simply wander into one of the beach bars for a cold one and a plate of fresh prawns. Find extra details at intersailclub.com. Honeymooners and couples can relax in Ibiza’s crystal-clear waters, enjoy unforgettable sunsets, explore its natural beauty spots, taste local renowned cuisine and have fun in an evening out at one of the famous nightclubs and bars. During the day, try one of the diverse leisure activities: visit a hippie market, book a day boat tour to famous Formentera, go on-board and try a diving experience, join a tour and discover the island by Vespa bike, visit a farm-house and learn how to produce traditional herb liquor and artisan soap …

Low season typically refers to any time outside of the high season periods. Groups of families and friends looking for a relaxing luxury vacation are advised to avoid high season weeks and opt for weeks outside of this time. The busiest periods are of course reflected in the charter costs and can be up to 15 to 30 percent more expensive than typical low season periods. Chartering a few weeks either side of these busy periods can be almost exactly the same, with the weather almost unchanged in some places, with far less crowds. Your broker will be able to provide you with an accurate estimation of all the costs involved in advance but here is a breakdown of what to expect. In general, you’ll find two basic rates: high season and low season, usually with specific dates set for each. In addition, you’ll find special events that are more expensive: New Year’s Eve, Monaco during the Grand Prix, Cannes during the Film Festival, the Olympics or the America’s Cup.

You might not always get the good weather but this part of the UK equals many of its European rivals in beauty. Over 95 miles of uniquely formed ancient coastline stretch all the way from East Devon to Dorset. Otherwise known as the Jurassic Coast, some of the rock formations here are 185 million years old and its England’s first natural World Heritage Site. Set sail from Weymouth Harbour and stop off at all the local beauty spots – Durdle Door, Lulworth cove and countless historic coastal villages.

Sailing tip of the day: Overlaying radar on the chart helps to interpret the display! The biggest problem most of us face when interpreting radar is lack of familiarity. We go about our daily business most of the year, then come aboard, hit the fog and turn it on. Unfortunately, unlike GPS, AIS and the rest, radar is more of a conversation between the operator and the instrument, so it’s not surprising we have trouble interpreting the picture. When I’m motoring, I, therefore, make a practice of keeping my radar transmitting even in good visibility and running an overlay on the chartplotter to keep me familiar with its drawbacks. The image above, for example, clearly shows that what the radar sees may not stack up with what the chart is telling me. Note how the trace seems mysteriously to end halfway up the coast. So it does, but that’s because the echo returning from high cliffs in the south gets lost when the land falls away to lower-lying estuarial terrain. The echo ends either because the flat shoreline isn’t providing a good enough target, or because the coast falls below the scanner’s visual horizon.

Author: ResortPro